ECE 499: Modeling and Control of Physiological Systems

 

Spring 2009

 

Credits 3

 MW 10:30 am -11:45 am

Science and Technology I, Rm 126

Instructor:

            Siddhartha Sikdar, PhD

            Assistant Professor

            Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering

            Volgenau School of IT&E

            Office: Science and Tech II, Room 207B

            Email: ssikdar@gmu.edu

            Phone: 703-993-1539

            Office hours: Monday/Wednesdays 2:00-4:00 pm and by appointment

 

Prerequisites:

1.     Calculus and differential equations   (MATH 214 or equivalent)

2.     Elementary physics (PHYS 260 and 261 or equivalent)

3.     Signals and Systems (ECE 320 or equivalent)

 

 

Textbook (Required):

Physiological Control Systems: Analysis, Simulation and Estimation

By: Michael C. K. Khoo

Publisher: Wiley IEEE Press, 1999

 

Course Description:

The human body is a fascinating interconnection of organ systems that work together in complex ways. One aspect of bioengineering aims to utilize quantitative techniques to understand the function of the human body, both for basic science research as well as for diagnosis and treatment of disease. This course will introduce the basic concepts and tools for modeling physiological systems using engineering analogies, and discuss several practical applications. The course will involve hands-on modeling using JSIM, an intuitive physiological modeling tool.

 

Grading:

25%: Homework

25%: Midterm

50%: Final Exam

 

 

Module

Week

Topics

Module 1. Introduction to physiological modeling

1

1/21

  • What is a model? Why model?
  • Multiscale organization of living organisms: cell to organ
  • Homeostasis. Examples of physiological control systems.

2

1/26

1/28

  • Review of linear systems concepts
  • Fourier series: Modeling signals using Fourier series
  • Deterministic and stochastic signals and systems

Module 2.

The mathematical tools

3

2/2

2/4

  • Basic concepts of control systems; Open vs. closed loop
  • Steady state and transient analysis of control systems
  • Introduction to JSIM

4

2/9

2/11

  • Linear models vs nonlinear models
  • Distributed vs. lumped parameter models
  • Compartment models

Module 3 A.

Building blocks:

Cardiovascular and Respiratory system

5

2/16

2/18

  • Circulatory system. Key events in the cardiac cycle.
  • Blood pressure and flow, vascular impedance

6

2/23

2/25

  • Lumped parameter models, windkessel model of circulation
  • Cardiac mechanics.

7

3/2

3/4

  • Respiratory mechanics, lung models
  • Mid term review

 

8

3/16

Mid Term Exam

Module 3 B.

Building blocks:

Nervous system.

9

3/18

3/23

3/25

  • Anatomy and physiology of nerves
  • Action potentials
  • Hodgkin-Huxley model

Module 3 C.

Building blocks:

Musculoskeletal system.

10

3/30

4/1

4/6

  • Muscle anatomy and physiology. How muscles contract
  • Hill model of muscle contraction
  • Muscle stretch reflex

Module 3 D.

Building blocks:

Endocrine system

11

4/8

  • Enzymes and hormones
  • Michaelis-Menten enzyme kinetics
  • Examples of endocrine control: glucose-insulin system, thyroid hormone system.

Module 4.

Putting it all together: Modeling complex physiological control systems

12

4/13

4/15

Regulation of cardiac output

  • Starling’s law, pressure-volume curves
  • Coupled model of cardiopulmonary system

13

4/20

4/22

Blood pressure regulation

  • Baroreceptor reflex.
  • The role of the kidney in blood pressure regulation

14

4/27

4/29

Blood glucose regulation

  • Insulin control of glucose
  • Glucose utilization in muscle

Module 5.

Wrap up

15

5/4

  • Model parameter estimation, sensitivity analysis.
  • Course review, practice problems.

 

16

5/6

Final Exam

Course structure: 

The course will consist of two weekly lectures, homework assignments and two exams. The homework assignments will involve some programming in JSIM and analysis of JSIM models. The exams will be closed book and closed notes.

 

Homework:

There will be assigned homework throughout the semester. The homework will involve processing and analysis of real signals, and will involve programming and analysis of models. Homework submitted after the due date will be penalized (15% penalty for each day late). No homework will be accepted after one week from the due date.

5 points of the homework grade is reserved for class participation. One student will be assigned each week on a rotating basis to take the lead on compiling a summary of the discussions in class. The student should compare notes with other students and post their summary on the discussion board on the class home page. These summaries should be used as a supplement to the lecture slides in preparing for examinations. The class participation grade will be based on the quality of these discussion summaries.

           

Exams:

The midterm and final exams will be closed book and notes. They will consist of a mixture of essay-type and multiple-choice type questions. Absence from exams must be notified ahead of time and alternative arrangements made with the instructor. 

 

Academic Honesty and Collaboration:

The integrity of the University community is affected by the individual choices made by each of us. GMU has an Honor Code with clear guidelines regarding academic integrity.  Three fundamental and rather simple principles to follow at all times are that:  (1) all work submitted be your own; (2) when using the work or ideas of others, including fellow students, give full credit through accurate citations; and (3) if you are uncertain about the ground rules on a particular assignment, ask for clarification.  No grade is important enough to justify academic misconduct. 

With collaborative work, names of all the participants should appear on the work.  Homework problems are designed to be undertaken independently.  You may discuss your ideas with others and conference with peers; however, it is not appropriate to give your work to someone else to review.  You are responsible for making certain that there is no question that the work you hand in is your own.  If only your name appears on an assignment, your professor has the right to expect that you have done the work yourself, fully and independently.

Plagiarism means using the exact words, opinions, or factual information from another person without giving the person credit.  Writers give credit through accepted documentation styles, such as parenthetical citation, footnotes, or endnotes.    Paraphrased material must also be properly cited.  A simple listing of books or articles is not sufficient.  Plagiarism is the equivalent of intellectual robbery and cannot be tolerated in the academic setting.  If you have any doubts about what constitutes plagiarism, please see the instructor. 

 

Relevant Campus and Academic Resources

Disability Services

            Any student with documented learning disabilities or other conditions that may affect academic performance should: 1) make sure this documentation is on file with the Office of Disability Services (SUB I, Rm. 222; 993-2474; www.gmu.edu/student/drc) to determine the accommodations you might need; and 2) talk with the instructor to discuss reasonable accommodations.

Office of Diversity Programs and Services

            SUB 1, Rm. 345; 993-2700; www.gmu.edu/student/msaf/index.html

Writing Center

            Robinson A116; 993-1200; writingcenter.gmu.edu.