Volgenau School of Engineering
George Mason University
George Mason University Mason
George Mason University

People

Electrical and computer engineers change the world by developing electronic devices and systems that improve communications, health care, space exploration, transportation, and computing.

Making a Mark by Making a Difference

We tackle the tough problems and develop solutions that improve people’s lives. Our community includes:

  • Top faculty researchers doing groundbreaking work in signal processing, communications, robotics and control theory, cryptography, computer architecture, and nanotechnology.
  • Outstanding adjunct faculty bringing industry expertise into the classroom.
  • Dedicated staff members creating a positive environment for our students and faculty.
  • Diverse alumni creating a professional network that supports our students.
  • Generous donors offering a hand up to the next generation.
  • Devoted advisory board members committed to developing future engineering professionals.

Join Us at Mason

Learn to connect the world with high-speed links and create high-performance computing platforms. You'll become a part of a smart, fun, hardworking community of students who:

  • Are inquisitive with a drive to succeed.
  • Are highly recruited by employers.
  • Develop creative, enterprising senior design projects.
  • Serve communities around the nation and the world.
  • Conduct critical research that help solve the world’s most challenging problems.
  • Become leaders in industry and government.
Students work with Peter Pachowicz, an associate professor of Electrical and Computer Engineering, on a satellite dish that serves as a platform for student projects involving satellite communications, space communications, and Earth-moon-Earth communications.

Instead of going to a scrap yard, this satellite dish serves as a platform for student projects involving satellite communications, space communications, and Earth-moon-Earth communications. With renewed interest in space travel and exploration, the dish will allow students to receive, process, and analyze signals from missions to the moon. Those working with the dish include, from left front, Sammy Lin and Aaron Martinez, and back row, Brian Smiga, Landon DeCoito, Peter Pachowicz, Jay Deorukhkar, and Keerthan Nukavarapu.

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